CAPT. BILL STEWART

  • General
    • Vessel Name : CAPT. BILL STEWART
    • Operator : AEP RIVER OPERATIONS
    • Ships Type (ICST) : 432
    • Vessel Type : Pushboat
    • Construction : Steel
  • Engine
    • Horsepower rating : 5600
  • Location
    • City : TOWSON
    • STATE : MD
  • Capacity
    • Net Tonnage : 540
  • Size
    • Register length : 128 Feet
    • Regular Breadth : 42 Feet
    • Overall Length : 128 Feet
    • Overall Breadt : 42 Feet
    • Load draft : 8.6 Feet
    • Light Draft : 8 Feet
    • Height : 45.2 Feet
  • Other
    • Year : 1976
    • EQUIP1 : NONE
    • Coast Guard Number : 575823

AEP RIVER OPERATIONS

  • Area of Operation : INLAND WATERWAYS OF THE U.S.
  • Principal Commodity : TOWING, COAL, GRAIN, GRAIN PRODUCTS, CEMENT, CHEMICALS, SALT, STEEL, LIME, COKE, SLAG, ALUMINUM, FERTILIZER, AGGREGATES AND OTHER DRY BULK MATERIALS

AEP FUTURE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

AEP LEGACY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

BOONESBORO

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT BUCK LAY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. GERALD BOGGS

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. JAMES ANDERSON

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. JOHN REYNOLDS

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CHRISTOPHER M PARSONAGE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CODY BOYD

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

D.& R. BONEY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

DANIEL W. WISE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

DONNA RUSHING

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

DRU LIRETTE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ELIZABETH ANN

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

GALE R RHODES

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

HAROLD B. DODD

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

JAMES E. PINSON

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

JAMES R. MOREHEAD

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

JEFFREY A. RAIKE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

JEFFREY G. STOVER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

KEITH DARLING

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

LEONARD L. WHITTINGTON

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MARY SCHEEL

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MICHAEL G. MORRIS

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MIKE WEISEND

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MOUNTAIN STATE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

NOBLE C. PARSONAGE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

NORMAN L. SNODGRASS

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

R. L. CARTER, JR.

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ROBERT D. BYRD

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ROBERT L. POSEY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ROGER W. KEENEY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

RON W. CALLEGAN

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

SAFETY LEADER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

AEP

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

MEM

  • Type : Covered Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

WRS

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

KIRBY

  • Type : Other
  • Construction : Steel

KRISTEN

  • Type : Covered Dry Cargo Barge
  • Construction : Steel

M

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

News

COVID-19 Impacts on Demurrage and Detention

COVID-19 Impacts on Demurrage and Detention

What might not be so obvious in this COVID-19 environment, which we have grown to associate with shortages, is that counterintuitively there are issues beginning to appear dealing with the opposite situation. The Journal of Commerce has reported that “[t]he container shipping industry is marshaling a response to signs of a building import backlog as some retailers and manufacturers fail to pick

USNS Comfort Docks in New York

USNS Comfort Docks in New York

The U.S. Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) arrived in New York Monday to support COVID-19 response efforts in the epicenter of America's coronavirus outbreak.The ship will serve as a referral hospital for non-coronavirus patients currently admitted to shore-based hospitals, and will provide a full spectrum of medical care to include general surgeries

USNS Comfort Departs for New York

USNS Comfort Departs for New York

U.S. Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) departed Norfolk, Va. Saturday for New York City in support of the COVID-19 response efforts.The Military Sealift Command ship will serve as a referral hospital for patients not infected with COVID-19, providing a full spectrum of medical care to include general surgeries, critical care and ward care for adults

Containership Runs Aground Near New Orleans

Containership Runs Aground Near New Orleans

A 334-meter containership ran aground near mile marker 81 of the Mississippi River, Friday, the U.S. Coast Guard said.Coast Guard watchstanders in New Orleans received a call at 3:20 a.m. that the Liberian-flagged Belita had run aground near 12-mile point, at mile marker 81 of the Mississippi River.

Sub M Progress – an Update

Sub M Progress – an Update

Subchapter M, the United States regulatory code dealing with towing vessels and requirements for towing vessel safety, has officially been in place since July 20, 2016, when the U.S. Coast Guard finalized Sub M rulemaking.Since the rules were finalized there have been a couple of important hammer dates. In spring and summer 2018 the first certificates of inspection (COI) were issued.

2020 Vision

2020 Vision

The Congress worked hard and most importantly together at the end of the recently-concluded First Session in December to finalize and pass Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 appropriations that included the Energy & Water Development (E&WD) Appropriations bill that funds the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) work on the nations’ waterways.

The Federal Government’s 2020 Inland Impact

The Federal Government’s 2020 Inland Impact

It is often difficult to push through the federal government morass to focus on the issues that actually matter to the inland operator. While 2020 inevitably will be a contentious year in American politics, it is critical to stay focused on the items that will have direct impact on the U.S. maritime industry.

The Good, the Bad and the Undeniably Ugly

The Good, the Bad and the Undeniably Ugly

The end of 2019 promises to be a busy, and potentially discordant, legislative and regulatory period for the United States maritime industry as both Congress and the Executive Branch look to take decisive action, with both positive and negative potential impacts depending on your perspective.

Most NY Waterway Ferries Back in Service

Most NY Waterway Ferries Back in Service

The majority of NY Waterway ferries taken out of service for safety violations last month have returned to regular operations, the U.S. Coast Guard said.On November 24, the Coast Guard revealed that Sector New York marine inspectors determined that 23 of NY Waterway's 32 ferries had damage or discrepancies significant enough to warrant a suspension of service.

Semi-submerged Tug Leaking Diesel after Bridge Allision

Semi-submerged Tug Leaking Diesel after Bridge Allision

A tugboat is partially sunk and leaking diesel after alliding with a bridge in North Carolina's Oregon Inlet, the U.S. Coast Guard said.All eight people aboard the tug Miss Bonnie reached shore safely without injury after the vessel struck the Old Bonner Bridge at 11:09 a.m. on Sunday.

US Releases New Images from Tanker Attacks

US Releases New Images from Tanker Attacks

The U.S. military on Monday released new images it says showed Iran's Revolutionary Guard (IRGC) removing an unexploded limpet mine from a Japanese-owned tanker that was attacked on June 13 in the Gulf of Oman, as Washington blames Tehran for the attack."Iran is responsible for the attack based on video evidence and the resources and proficiency needed to quickly remove the unexploded limpet mine

INLAND FINANCE: But I Don’t Need That Much

INLAND FINANCE: But I Don’t Need That Much

When enough to meet the need is not enough to get the help.From my office window in downtown St. Louis, I can see a dramatic illustration of the inefficiency in how our country moves freight. My office faces east, and I look down on a stretch of Interstate 70, that major east-west highway that runs from Baltimore to Interstate 15 in Utah.