FMT

  • General
    • Vessel Name : FMT
    • Operator : SOUTHERN TOWING CO.
    • Ships Type (ICST) : Liquid Tank Barge (Double Hull)
    • Vessel Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Hull)
    • Construction : Steel
  • Engine
  • Location
    • City : MEMPHIS
    • STATE : TN
  • Capacity
    • Net Tonnage : 1619
    • Full Load Capacity : 3100 Short ton
  • Size
    • Register length : 297.5 Feet
    • Regular Breadth : 54 Feet
    • Overall Length : 297.6 Feet
    • Overall Breadt : 54 Feet
    • Load draft : 10 Feet
    • Light Draft : 2 Feet
    • Height : 22 Feet
  • Other
    • Year : 1975
    • EQUIP1 : DIESEL PUMP
    • Coast Guard Number : 683721

SOUTHERN TOWING CO.

  • Area of Operation : MISSISSIPPI RIVER SYSTEM AND GULF INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY; AND ARKANSAS, OHIO, ILLINOIS AND TENNESSEE RIVERS
  • Principal Commodity : TOWING BULK LIQUID CHEMICALS AND AMMONIA

ARNE CHRISTIANSEN

  • Type : Tugboat
  • Construction : Steel

BAXTER SOUTHERN

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

BILL STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

BOBBY JONES

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT H R KIRTLEY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT TOMMY PARRISH

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. RICHARD SIDES

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. SAM YOUNT

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CAPT. TOMMY PARISH

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CHARLES SOUTHERN

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

CHERYL STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

DAVID STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

DENNIS COLLINS

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

FRANK B. TAMBLE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

FRANK HOLLOMAN

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

FRANK STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

FRANK T. STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

JO ANNE STEGBAUER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

KEVIN CONWAY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

LARRY TILLEY

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

LAURA ELIZABETH

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

LAURA TAMBLE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MARY ELIZABETH

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

PAULA FORTIER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ROBERT INGLE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

SCOTT STEGBAUER

  • Type : Tugboat
  • Construction : Steel

THERESA ECHOLS

  • Type : Tugboat
  • Construction : Steel

A

  • Type : Other Liquid Cargo Barge Not Elsewhere Included
  • Construction : Steel

AF

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Sided Only)
  • Construction : Steel

AT

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Sided Only)
  • Construction : Steel

CTCO

  • Type : Other Liquid Cargo Barge Not Elsewhere Included
  • Construction : Steel

HINES

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Hull)
  • Construction : Steel

HMS

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Hull)
  • Construction : Steel

MMI

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Hull)
  • Construction : Steel

STC

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Hull)
  • Construction : Steel

TW

  • Type : Liquid Cargo Barge (Double Sided Only)
  • Construction : Steel

WTC

  • Type : Other Liquid Cargo Barge Not Elsewhere Included
  • Construction : Steel

News

Marine News' Top Boats of 2020

Marine News' Top Boats of 2020

This year, despite innumerable challenges and setbacks, a great number of new U.S.-flagged vessels made their way into service. In addition to Maid of the Mist's new electric tour boats James V. Glynn and Nikola Tesla featured Wednesday, the newbuilds highlighted below are some of the most noteworthy to come out of U.S. shipyards in 2020.DredgerU.S.

US Shipyards See Big Business Shifts

US Shipyards See Big Business Shifts

The American shipbuilding scene, filled with participants constructing all manner of vessels, has been navigating through stormy times (lately, yards along the Gulf Coast have literally been dealing with storms). The orders for newbuild, repair and conversion projects continue to flow in—albeit at a reduced pace—and the boats and ships go down the ways into the water