STYMIE

  • General
    • Vessel Name : STYMIE
    • Operator : HUGHES BROS., INC.
    • Ships Type (ICST) : Open Dry Cargo Barge
    • Vessel Type : Open Hopper Barge
    • Construction : Steel
  • Engine
  • Location
    • City : NEW YORK
    • STATE : NY
  • Capacity
    • Net Tonnage : 717
    • Full Load Capacity : 1000 Short ton
  • Size
    • Register length : 150 Feet
    • Regular Breadth : 37 Feet
    • Overall Length : 150 Feet
    • Overall Breadt : 37 Feet
    • Load draft : 8.5 Feet
    • Light Draft : 4.3 Feet
    • Height : 13.8 Feet
  • Other
    • Year : 1984
    • EQUIP1 : NONE
    • Coast Guard Number : 1233157

HUGHES BROS., INC.

  • Area of Operation : EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES
  • Principal Commodity : CHARTERS TO OTHERS

BRIDGEBUILDER

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

BRIDGEBUILDER 22

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

MIGHTY JOE

  • Type : Pushboat
  • Construction : Steel

ALFALFA

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

BILL

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

BOB

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

CATHERINE

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

CHUBBY

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

DARLA

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

HUGHES

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

LINDA

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

OAK

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

SHARON

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

SPANKY

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

THOMAS

  • Type : Covered Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

VIRGINIA

  • Type : Flat / Deck Barge
  • Construction : Steel

WHEEZER

  • Type : Open Hopper Barge
  • Construction : Steel

News

Study: Sunlight Degrades Polystyrene Faster than Expected

Study: Sunlight Degrades Polystyrene Faster than Expected

A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world’s most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought.  The study published October 10, 2019, in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters.