DELAWARE RIVER PORT AUTHORITY

  • Engineering District : 7
  • TSO Series Number : TS-5 Transportation Lines on the Atlantic Gulf and Pacific Coasts
  • Principal Commodity List : PASSENGERS
  • Area of Operation : DELAWARE RIVER BETWEEN PHILADELPHIA, PA AND CAMDEN, NJ
  • Vessels
    • Specialized Carrier : 1
    • Vessels List : FREEDOM
  • Address
    ONE PORT CENTER, 2 RIVERSIDE DRIVE;P. O. BOX 1949 CAMDEN NJ 08101
  • Contact
    • Phone : 856-968-2285
ONE PORT CENTER, 2 RIVERSIDE DRIVE;P. O. BOX 1949 CAMDEN NJ 08101

Managed Vessel

FREEDOM

  • Type : Ferry
  • Construction : Steel

Related News [DELAWARE RIVER PORT AUTHORITY]

Third Temporary Channel Opened in Baltimore

Third Temporary Channel Opened in Baltimore

The Captain of the Port (COTP) has established the Fort Carroll Temporary Alternate Channel, which is on the northeast side of the main channel in the vicinity of the Francis Scott Key Bridge and will provide limited access for commercially essential vessels.The channel has a controlling depth of 20 feet, a 300-foot horizontal clearance, and a vertical clearance of 135 feet

FBI Opens Criminal Probe Into Deadly Baltimore Bridge Collapse

FBI Opens Criminal Probe Into Deadly Baltimore Bridge Collapse

The FBI said on Monday it opened a criminal probe into the collapse of a Baltimore bridge in March when a ship crashed into a bridge support, while local officials confirmed the recovery of a fourth body from the incident.FBI agents boarded the cargo ship Dali to conduct court-authorized law enforcement activity regarding the crash, an FBI spokesperson said.

Divers Recover Two Bodies After Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Divers Recover Two Bodies After Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Divers on Wednesday recovered the remains of two of the six workers missing since they were tossed into Baltimore Harbor from a highway bridge that collapsed into shipping lanes when a faltering cargo freighter rammed into the structure, officials said on Wednesday.The bodies were pulled from the mouth of the Patapsco River a day after the massive container ship lost power and its ability to

Baltimore Rescuers Lose Hope for More Survivors from Bridge Collapse

Baltimore Rescuers Lose Hope for More Survivors from Bridge Collapse

Rescuers have lost hope of finding more survivors of the Baltimore bridge collapse, the coast guard said, as efforts switched on Wednesday to looking for bodies of the missing and more answers to why a container ship smashed into the span.Search divers were expected to return near dawn to the waters surrounding the twisted ruins of the bridge in Baltimore Harbor to search for six workers missing

Divers to Search Baltimore Harbor

Divers to Search Baltimore Harbor

Search divers were expected to return near dawn on Wednesday to the waters surrounding the twisted ruins of a bridge knocked down in Baltimore Harbor by a faltering cargo ship, leaving six workers missing and presumed dead.The disaster also forced the indefinite closure of the Port of Baltimore, one of the busiest on the U.S.

Baltimore Bridge Collision Sends Vehicles Tumbling Into Water

Baltimore Bridge Collision Sends Vehicles Tumbling Into Water

A container ship smashed into a four-lane bridge in the U.S. port of Baltimore in darkness on Tuesday, causing it to collapse and sending cars and people plunging into the river below.Rescuers pulled out two survivors, one in a "very serious condition," and were searching for more in the Patapsco River after huge spans of the 1.6-mile (2.57 km) Francis Scott Key Bridge crumpled into the water.

LiveStream: Rescuers Search Water for Survivors After Ship Collides with Baltimore Bridge

LiveStream: Rescuers Search Water for Survivors After Ship Collides with Baltimore Bridge

A major bridge collapsed in the U.S. port of Baltimore in the early hours of Tuesday after being struck by a container ship, plunging cars and as many as 20 people into the river below.Rescuers were searching for survivors in the Patapsco Riverafter huge spans of the 1.6-mile (2.57 km) Francis Scott Key Bridge crumpled into the water.

Baltimore's Key Bridge Collapses After Ship Crash

Baltimore's Key Bridge Collapses After Ship Crash

The 1.6-mile (2.57 km) long Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Maryland, collapsed in the early hours of Tuesday after a container ship hit it, and as many as seven people may be in the water, officials said.A live video posted on YouTube showed a ship hitting the bridge, after which several of its spans collapsed into the Patapsco River.

Eastern Gets Green Light to Build USACE Hopper Dredge

Eastern Gets Green Light to Build USACE Hopper Dredge

Florida-based Eastern Shipbuilding Group announced on Tuesday it has received a notice to proceed after winning a contract to design and build a new hopper dredge for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).The 6,000-cubic-yard-capacity diesel-electric dredge will be constructed at Eastern’s Allanton and Port St. Joe facilities and is scheduled for delivery in 2027, the builder said.

Russia Strikes Port Facilities in Ukraine's Izmail

Russia Strikes Port Facilities in Ukraine's Izmail

Russian state news agency RIA said overnight Russian strikes on the Ukrainian port of Izmail had hit port and grain infrastructure housing foreign mercenaries and military hardware, as well as a naval ship repair yard.RIA cited Sergei Lebedev, a man it described as a coordinator of an underground group in the Ukrainian port city of Mykolaiv and who it said had sources in Izmail

Kakhovka Dam Collapse Blocks Gateway for Ukrainian Exports

Kakhovka Dam Collapse Blocks Gateway for Ukrainian Exports

The destruction of the Kakhovka dam in southern Ukraine has made it impossible to navigate parts of the Dnipro River and deprived Kyiv of an important agricultural export route, shipping authorities said.The loss of the route is another problem for Ukraine as uncertainty hangs over the future of a U.N.-brokered deal allowing the safe export of grain from three Ukrainian ports.

How Gdańsk is Reclaiming its Industrial Waterfront

How Gdańsk is Reclaiming its Industrial Waterfront

The prosperity of port cities, throughout history, has been closely tied to the ports’ ability to adapt to economic and technological change. As ships got bigger, ports had to keep up. This has often seen the port proper grow apart from the city whose name it bears because the old harbor could no longer accommodate the needs of modernized shipping.